Saturday, February 8, 2020

Fall of late Qing dynasty- challenges from the West Essay

Fall of late Qing dynasty- challenges from the West - Essay Example These activities drew European countries that were exceedingly eager to connect with the wealthy China that ruled the continent and the seas. However, several factors arose in the 1800s that made the dynasty lose its global economic leadership. The country was hit by social turmoil, economic fracturing, and European imperialism. In this paper, I will outline the factors that made the Qing Empire collapse. Supremacy of the Qing Dynasty Qing dynasty was one of the greatest empires during the early-modern period. It existed at the same period with other empires such as Mugal Empire, ottoman, Austria-Hungary, and Russian empire (Ma, 30). The Qing Empire was the first to fall among the superior empires at the time. The empire was beset by a struggle between westerners and traditionalists during the nineteenth century. The modernizing party introduced nationalism in china as it did in Russia and Turkey. The party argued that imperialism was obsolete and obstructed the national sensibility of the majorities. The concept of nationalism had been drawn from the historical output, legal structure, and the educational system. Han Chinese, Mongols, Manchus, and Tibetans drew upon the imperial legacy to establish clear ideas of their language, religions, and aristocratic traditions (Ma, 31). This strengthened the nationalist idealism that championed for equal representation of the majority in the dynasty. This opened the avenue for encroachment by western countries. Imperial encroachment and nationalistic movements were significant in weakening the unity of the empire even before the Chinese revolt broke out in October 1911 (Ma, 35). The Qing Empire had suffered a dramatic loss of some of its territory to imperial powers. One of the losses was the Qing northern pacific coast that ceded to Russia through a treaty in 1860. The region is currently known as the Russian maritime province. Russia ceased another part of the Qing Empire in 1871 when it took over East Turkestan. Tibe t followed suit when it was invaded by Britain in 1904. Britain and Tibet signed a short lived treaty and Qing paid indemnity to Britain in 1906. This brought an international consensus that forbade Britain and Tibet from signing treaties directly. However, Britain continues with their support for Tibet nationalists, which led to the 1906 Tibet independence. Mongolia followed suit and became independent in 1921 putting an end to the Outer Mongolia region of the Qing Empire. China’s civil war in the nineteenth century is not sufficiently treated as modern warfare compared to the American civil war or the Indian rebellion of 1857 (Ma, 40). The Taiping war of 1850-1864 was the bloodiest conflict during the revolution and remains to be the bloodiest conflict in history. The war caused fatalities of between 25 to 40 million people and the majorities were civilians. There were months of siege war and starvation was used as a weapon on both sides. The Taiping created a base and a bu reaucratic government at Nanjing, an area that experienced the longest siege. Europe and America were attracted to the conflict due to the proclaimed Christianity by Taiping. However, the Qing Empire was economically stable, and western powers opted to support them against Taiping by providing military support. Contribution of foreign Nations Western powers sent troops and mercenaries to Qing Empire to suppress the Taiping. By 1860, several British

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Price Elasticity or Demand & Marginal Utility Essay Example for Free

Price Elasticity or Demand Marginal Utility Essay Part A   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   Based on its definition, the major determinants of price elasticity of demand would be the percentage change of quantity demanded and prices of the goods and services. We can say that a certain good is an elastic or inelastic good based on the above identified determinants of price elasticity of demand (Moffatt 1).   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   Like for instance, let us consider the case of bottled water in the market. Since there are a lot of companies that produces bottled water, this product can only be considered as elastic good because even if the prices of bottled water decrease in the market the demand would change significantly since bottled waters are goods that can be classified as normal goods. Moreover, there are a lot of substitutes for bottled water in the market which makes the demand react instantly on slight changes in the current prices of this kind of goods. On the other hand, the price elasticity of toothpaste is also elastic because the percentage change of demand is significant for a percentage unit change on its prices due to the existence of substitute toothpaste in the market. As for the case of Crest it has inelastic demand elasticity since during the 1950’s it is the only toothpaste that has fluoride and there is an absence of substitute product for this kind of toothpaste at that time. Meaning, the demand for Crest toothpaste remains high especially for those people who are health conscious regardless of the price level of the said product. Next product would be Ketchup which also has the same demand elasticity as bottled water and toothpaste- elastic demand. The last but not the least product would be Microsoft Windows operating system. Since majority of computers nowadays uses Windows operating system, the demand for this product is really high and consumers are very much willing to pay even high prices just to have this product. In other words, the percentage change of Windows operating system will not greatly affect the percentage change of demand for this product. Part B No. of Pizza Slices Consumed Total Utility Marginal Utility 1 20 n.a. 2 28 8 3 40 12 4 47 7 5 52 5   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   Based on the table above, during the consumption of the first slice of pizza, my friend derived a total utility of 20 units. On the second slice of pizza, he derived 28 units of utility and 40 units during the third slice of pizza. On the fourth slice of pizza he looks as if he is not that much eager to get a slice of pizza and derived only 47 units of utility and 52 on the fifth slice of pizza. Based from this data we can now compute for the marginal utility that my friend was able to derive out of consuming 5 out of 8 slices of pizza. We can see clearly that my friend had an increasing marginal utility on consuming slices of pizza up to the 3rd slice. The fourth slice was not able to satisfy my friend as he approached saturation on consuming slices of pizza. My friend said to me that he experienced the same feeling, feeling of saturation after consuming a number of a single product, when consuming soft drinks and burgers. The more he eats burgers or drink soft drinks, he starts to value less the succeeding pieces of burger or bottle of soft drinks after some point in time. Works Cited Moffatt, Mike â€Å"Price Elasticity of Demand.† 2007. About.com.   24 February 2008 http://economics.about.com/cs/micfrohelp/a/priceelasticity.htm.

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

Their Eyes Were Watching God Essay -- Essays Papers

Their Eyes Were Watching God An Analysis So many people in modern society have lost their voices. Laryngitis is not the cause of this sad situation-- they silence themselves, and have been doing so for decades. For many, not having a voice is acceptable socially and internally, because it frees them from the responsibility of having to maintain opinions. For Janie Crawford, it was not: she finds her voice among those lost within the pages of Zora Neale Hurston’s famed novel, Their Eyes Were Watching God. This dynamic character’s natural intelligence, talent for speaking, and uncommon insights made her the perfect candidate to develop into the outspoken, individual woman she has wanted to be all along. As the novel begins, Janie walks into her former hometown quietly and bravely. She is not the same woman who left; she is not afraid of judgment or envy. Full of â€Å"self-revelation†, she begins telling her tale to her best friend, Phoeby, by looking back at her former self with the kind of wistfulness everyone expresses when they remember a time of childlike naà ¯vetà ©. She tries to express her wonderment and innocence by describing a blossoming peach tree that she loved, and in doing so also reveals her blossoming sexuality. To deter Janie from any trouble she might find herself in, she was made to marry an older man named Logan Killicks at the age of 16. In her naà ¯vetà ©, she expected to feel love eventually for this man. Instead, however, his love for her fades and she beco...

Monday, January 13, 2020

Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ’s Childhood Pal Chapter 30

Part VI Passion Nobody's perfect†¦. Well, there was this one guy, but we killed him. ANONYMOUS Sunday Joshua's mother and his brother James found us outside of the Golden Gate of Jerusalem, where we were waiting for Bartholomew and John, who were looking for Nathaniel and Philip to return with James and Andrew, who were off trying to find Judas and Thomas, who had been sent into the city to look for Peter and Maggie, who were looking for Thaddeus and Simon, who had been sent to look for a donkey. â€Å"You'd think they'd have found one by now,† Mary said. According to prophecy, Joshua was supposed to enter the city on the colt of a donkey. Of course, no one was going to find one. That was the plan. Even Joshua's brother James had agreed to be part of the conspiracy. He'd gone ahead to wait inside the gate, just in case one of the disciples had missed the point and actually came back with a donkey. About a thousand of Joshua's followers from Galilee had gathered on the road to the Golden Gate. They had lined the road with palm fronds for Joshua's entrance to the city, and they were cheering and singing hosannas all afternoon in anticipation of his triumphant entrance, but as the afternoon wore into evening, and no colt showed, the crowd gradually dispersed as everybody got hungry and went into the city to find something to eat. Only Joshua, his mother, and I were still waiting. â€Å"I was hoping you might talk some sense into him,† I said to Mary. â€Å"I've seen this coming for a long time,† Mary said. She wore her usual blue dress and shawl, and the usual light in her face seemed faded, not by age, but by grief. â€Å"Why do you think I sent for him two years ago?† It was true, she had sent Joshua's younger brothers Judah and Jose to the synagogue at Capernaum to bring him home, claiming he was mad, but Joshua hadn't even gone outside to meet them. â€Å"I wish you two wouldn't talk about me like I'm not here,† Joshua said. â€Å"We're trying to get used to it,† I said. â€Å"If you don't like it, then give up this stupid plan to sacrifice yourself.† â€Å"What do you think we've been preparing for all of these years, Biff?† â€Å"If I'd known it was this I wouldn't have helped. You'd still be stuck in a wine amphora in India.† He squinted to see through the gate. â€Å"Where is everyone? How hard can it be to find one simple ass?† I looked at Joshua's mother, and although there was pain in her eyes she smiled. â€Å"Don't look at me,† she said. â€Å"No one on my side of the family would ever sacrifice a straight line like that.† It was too easy, so I let it go. â€Å"They're all at Simon's house in Bethany, Josh. They aren't coming back tonight.† Joshua didn't say a word. He just climbed to his feet and walked off toward Bethany. â€Å"There is nothing you can do to stop this from happening!† Joshua screamed at the apostles, who were gathered in the front room of Simon's house. Martha ran from the room crying when Joshua glared at her. Simon looked at the floor, as did the rest of us. â€Å"The priest and the scribes will take me, and put me on trial. They will spit on me and scourge me and then they will kill me. I will rise from the dead on the third day and walk among you again, but you cannot stop what must happen. If you love me, you will accept what I'm telling you.† Maggie got up and ran out of the house, snatching the communal purse from Judas as she went. The Zealot started to rise to go after her but I pushed him back down on his cushion. â€Å"Let her go.† We all sat there in silence, trying to think of something to do, something to say. I don't know what everyone else was thinking, but I was still trying to formulate some way for Joshua to make his point without giving his life. Martha returned to the room with wine and cups and served each of us in turn, not looking at Joshua when she filled his cup. Joshua's mother followed her back out of the room, I presumed to help her prepare supper. In time, Maggie came back, sliding through the door and going directly to Joshua, where she sat down at his feet. She took the communal purse out of her cloak and from it she pulled a small alabaster box, the sort that was used to store the precious ointments that women used to anoint the bodies of the dead at burial. She tossed the empty purse to Judas. Without a word, she broke the seal on the box and poured the ointment on Joshua's feet, then untied her long hair and began to wipe the oil from his feet with it. The rich aroma of spices and perfume filled the room. In an instant Judas was on his feet and across the room. He snatched the box of ointment off the floor. â€Å"The money from this could have fed hundreds of the poor.† Joshua looked up at the Zealot and there were tears in his eyes. â€Å"You'll always have the poor, Judas, but I'm only here for a short while longer. Let her be.† â€Å"But†¦Ã¢â‚¬  â€Å"Let her be,† Joshua said. He held out his hand and Judas slammed the alabaster box into it, then stormed out of the house. I could hear him shouting out in the street, but I couldn't make out what he was saying. Maggie poured the rest of the oil on Joshua's head and drew patterns on his forehead with her finger. Joshua tried to take her hand but she pulled it away from him and stepped back until he dropped his hand. â€Å"A dead man can't love,† she said. â€Å"Be still.† When we followed Joshua to the Temple the next morning, Maggie was nowhere to be seen. Monday On Monday Joshua led us through the Golden Gate into Jerusalem, but this time there were no palm fronds laid on the road and no one was singing hosannas. (Well, there was this one guy, but he was always singing hosannas at the Golden Gate. If you gave him a coin he'd stop for a while.) â€Å"It would be nice to be able to buy a little something for breakfast,† Judas said. â€Å"If the Magdalene hadn't spent all of our money.† â€Å"Joshua smells nice, though,† Nathaniel said. â€Å"Don't you think Joshua smells nice?† Sometimes you find yourself grateful for the most unlikely things. Right then, when I saw Judas grit his teeth and the vein stand out on his forehead, I said a quick prayer of thanks for Nathaniel's na;vet. â€Å"He does smell nice,† said Bartholomew. â€Å"It makes one want to reassess one's values regarding the material comforts.† â€Å"Thank you, Bart,† said Joshua. â€Å"Yes, there's nothing like a good-smelling man,† said John dreamily. Suddenly we were all very uncomfortable and there was a lot of throat-clearing and coughing and we all walked a few paces farther apart. (I haven't told you about John, have I?) Then John started to make a great and pathetic show of noticing the women as they passed. â€Å"Why, that little heifer would give a man some strong sons,† John said in a booming and falsely masculine voice. â€Å"A man could surely plant some seed there, he could.† â€Å"Please shut up,† James said to his brother. â€Å"Maybe,† said Philip, â€Å"you could have your mother come over and tell that woman to cleave unto you.† Everyone snickered, even Joshua. Well, everyone except James. â€Å"You see?† he said to his brother. â€Å"You see what you've started? You little nancy.† â€Å"There's a nubile wench,† exclaimed John unconvincingly. He pointed to a woman who was being dragged toward the city gates by a group of Pharisees, her clothes hanging in shreds on her body (which indeed appeared to be nubile, so credit to John for working outside of his element). â€Å"Block the road,† Joshua said. The Pharisees came up to our human blockade and stopped. â€Å"Let us pass, Rabbi,† the oldest of them said. â€Å"This woman has been caught in the act of adultery this very day and we're taking her out of the city to be stoned, as is the law.† The woman was young and her hair fell in dirty curls around her face. Terror had twisted her face and her eyes were rolled back in her head, but an hour ago she had probably been pretty. Joshua crouched and began writing in the dust at his feet. â€Å"What's your name?† he asked. â€Å"Jamal,† said the leader. I watched Joshua write the man's name, then next to it a list of sins. â€Å"Wow, Jamal,† I said. â€Å"A goose? I didn't even know that was possible.† Jamal dropped the adulteress's arm and stepped back. Joshua looked up at the other man who was holding the woman. â€Å"And your name?† â€Å"Uh, Steve,† said that man. â€Å"His name is not Steve,† said another man in the crowd. â€Å"It's Jacob.† Joshua wrote â€Å"Jacob† in the dust. â€Å"No,† said Jacob. He let go of the woman, pushing her toward us. Then Joshua stood up and took the stone from the man nearest him, who surrendered it easily. His attention was focused on the list of sins written in the dirt. â€Å"Now let us stone this harlot,† Joshua said. â€Å"Whoever of you is without sin, cast the first stone.† And he held out the stone to them. They gradually backed away. In a moment they had all gone back the way they had come and the adulteress fell to Joshua's feet and hugged his ankles. â€Å"Thank you, Rabbi. Thank you so much.† â€Å"That's okay,† said Joshua. He lifted her to her feet. â€Å"Now go, and sin no more.† â€Å"You really smell good, you know that?† she said. â€Å"Yeah, thanks. Now go.† She started off. â€Å"I should make sure she gets home okay,† I said. I started off after her, but Joshua caught the back of my tunic and pulled me back. â€Å"You missed the ‘sin no more' part of my instructions?† â€Å"Look, I've already committed adultery with her in my heart, so, you know, why not enjoy it?† â€Å"No.† â€Å"You're the one who set the standards. By those rules, even John committed adultery with her in his heart, and he doesn't even like women.† â€Å"Do too,† said John. â€Å"To the Temple,† Joshua said, pressing on. â€Å"Waste of a perfectly good adulteress, if you ask me.† In the outer court of the Temple, where the women and the Gentiles were allowed to go, Joshua called us all together and began to preach the kingdom. Each time he would get started, a vendor would come by barking, â€Å"Get your doves. Get your sacrificial doves. Pure as the driven snow. Everybody needs one.† Then Joshua would begin again and the next vendor would come by. â€Å"Unleavened bread! Get your unleavened bread! Only one shekel. Piping hot matzo, just like Moses ate on the way out of Egypt, only fresher.† And a little girl who was lame was brought to Joshua and he started to heal her and ask about her faith when†¦ â€Å"Your denariis changed to shekels, while you wait! No amount too large or small. Drachmas to talents, talents to shekels – all your money changed while you wait.† â€Å"Do you believe that the Lord loves you?† Joshua asked the little girl. â€Å"Bitter herbs! Get your bitter herbs!† cried a vendor. â€Å"Dammit all!† Joshua screamed in frustration. â€Å"You're healed, child, now get out of here.† He waved off the little girl, who got up and walked for the first time in her life, then he slapped a dove vendor, ripped the top off his cage of birds, and released a cloud of doves into the sky. â€Å"This is a house of prayer! Not a den of thieves.† â€Å"Oh no, not the moneychangers,† Peter whispered to me. Joshua grabbed a long low table where men were changing a dozen currencies into shekels (the only coin allowed for commerce inside the Temple complex) and he flipped it over. â€Å"Oh, that's it, he's fucked,† Philip said. And he was. The priests took a big percentage from the moneychangers. He might have slid by before, but now he'd interfered with their income. â€Å"Out, you vipers! Out!† Joshua had taken a coil of rope from one of the vendors and was using it as a scourge to drive the vendors and the moneychangers out of the Temple gates. Nathaniel and Thomas had joined in Joshua's tirade, kicking at the merchants as they scampered away, but the rest of us sat staring or ministered to those who had come to hear Joshua speak. â€Å"We should stop this,† I said to Peter. â€Å"You think you could stop this?† Peter nodded to the corner of the courtyard, where at least twenty priests had come out from the Inner Temple to watch the fracas. â€Å"He's going to bring down the wrath of the priests on all of us,† Judas said. He was looking at the Temple guards, who had stopped pacing the walls and were watching the goings-on below in the courtyard. To Judas' credit, he, Simon, and a few of the others had managed to calm the small crowd of the faithful who had gathered to be blessed and healed before Joshua's tantrum. Beyond the walls of the Temple we could see the Roman soldiers staring down from the battlements of Herod the Great's old palace, which the governor commandeered during feast weeks when he brought the legions to Jerusalem. The Romans didn't enter the Temple unless they sensed insurrection, but if they entered, Jewish blood would be spilled. Rivers of it. â€Å"They won't come in,† Peter said, a tiny note of doubt in his voice. â€Å"They can see that this is a Jewish matter. They don't care if we kill each other.† â€Å"Just watch Judas and Simon,† I said. â€Å"If one of them starts with that no-master-but-God thing, the Romans will come down like an executioner's blade.† Finally, Joshua was out of breath, soaked in sweat, and barely able to swing the coil of rope he was carrying, but the Temple was clear of merchants. A large crowd had started to follow him, shouting at the vendors as Joshua drove them out of the Temple. The crowd (probably eight hundred to a thousand people) was the only thing that kept the priests from calling the guards down on Joshua right then. Josh tossed the rope aside and led the crowd back to where we had been watching in horror. â€Å"Thieves,† he said to us breathlessly as he passed. Then he went to a little girl with a withered arm who had been waiting beside Judas. â€Å"Pretty scary, huh?† Joshua said to her. She nodded. Joshua put his hands over her withered arm. â€Å"Are those guys in the tall hats coming over here?† She nodded again. â€Å"Here, can you make this sign with your finger?† He showed her how to stick out her middle finger. â€Å"No, not with that hand, with this one.† Joshua took his hand away from her withered arm and she wiggled her fingers. The muscle and tendons had filled out until it looked identical to her other arm. â€Å"Now,† Joshua said, â€Å"make that sign. That's good. Now show it to those guys behind me with the tall hats. That's a good girl.† â€Å"By whose authority do you perform these healings,† said one of the priests, obviously the highest-ranking of the group. â€Å"No master – † Simon began to shout but he was cut off by a vicious blow to the solar plexus from Peter, who then pushed the Zealot to the ground and sat on him while furiously whispering in his ear. Andrew had come up behind Judas and seemed to be delivering a similar lecture without benefit of the body blow. Josh took a little boy from his mother's arms and held him. The boy's legs waved in the air as if they had no bones at all. Without looking away from the boy, Joshua said, â€Å"By what authority did John baptize?† The priests looked around among themselves. The crowd moved in closer. We were in Judea, John's territory. The priests knew better than to challenge John's authority under God in front of a crowd this size, but they certainly weren't going to confirm it for Joshua's sake, either. â€Å"We can't say at this time,† said the priest. â€Å"Then I can't say either,† said Joshua. He stood the little boy on his feet and held him steady as the boy's legs took his full weight, probably for the first time ever. The boy wobbled like a newborn colt and Joshua caught him and laughed. He took the boy's shoulders and helped him walk back to his mother, then he turned on the priests and looked at them for the first time. â€Å"You would test me? Test me. Ask me what you will, you vipers, but I will heal these people and they shall know the word of God in spite of you.† Philip had moved up behind me during this speech and he whispered, â€Å"Can't you knock him out or something with your methods from the East? We have to get him out of here before he says any more.† â€Å"I think we're too late, John,† I said. â€Å"Just don't let the crowd disperse. Go out into the city and bring more. The crowd is his only protection now. And find Joseph of Arimathea too. He might be able to help if this gets out of hand.† â€Å"This isn't out of hand?† â€Å"You know what I mean.† The inquisition went on for two hours, with the priests concocting every verbal trap they could think of, and Joshua wiggling out sometimes, and blundering through at others. I looked for some way to get Joshua out of the Temple without him being arrested, but the more I looked, the more I noticed that the guards had moved down off the walls and were hovering around the gates to the courtyard. Meanwhile the chief priest droned on: â€Å"A man dies and leaves no sons, but his wife marries his brother, who has three sons by his first wife†¦[and on] The three of them leave Jericho and head south, going three point three furlongs per hour, but they are leading two donkeys, which can carry two†¦[and on] So the Sabbath ends, and they are able to resume, adding on the thousand steps allowed under the law†¦and the wind is blowing southwest at two furlongs per hour†¦[and on] How much water will be required for the journey? Give your answer in firkins.† â€Å"Five,† Joshua said, as soon as they stopped speaking. And all were amazed. The crowd roared. A woman shouted, â€Å"Surely he is the Messiah.† â€Å"The Son of God has come,† said another. â€Å"You guys aren't helping,† I shouted back at them. â€Å"You didn't show your work, you didn't show your work,† chanted the youngest of the priests. Judas and Matthew had been scratching out the problem on the paving stones of the courtyard as the priest recited, but they had long since lost track. They looked up and shook their heads. â€Å"Five,† Joshua repeated. The priests looked around among themselves. â€Å"That's right, but that doesn't give you authority to heal in the Temple.† â€Å"In three days, there will be no Temple, for I'll destroy it, and you nest of vipers with it. And three days after that, a new Temple shall be built in honor of my father.† And then I grabbed him around the chest and started dragging him toward the gate. The other apostles followed the plan and moved around us in a wedge. Beyond that, the crowd pressed in. Hundreds moved along with us. â€Å"Wait, I'm not done!† Joshua yelled. â€Å"Yes you are.† â€Å"Surely the true king of Israel has come to bring forth the kingdom,† one woman shouted. Peter smacked her on the back of the head. â€Å"Stop helping.† By the sheer mass of the crowd we were able to get Joshua out of the Temple and through the streets to Joseph of Arimathea's house. Joseph let us in and led us to the upper room, which had a high arched stone ceiling, rich carpets on the floors and walls, piles of cushions, and a long low table for dining. â€Å"You're safe here, but I don't know for how long. They've already called a meeting of the Sanhedrin.† â€Å"But we just left the Temple,† I said. â€Å"How?† â€Å"You should have let them take me,† Joshua said. â€Å"The table will be set for the Passover feast of the Essenes,† Joseph said. â€Å"Stay here for supper.† â€Å"Celebrate the Passover early? Why?† John asked. â€Å"Why celebrate with the Essenes?† Joseph looked away from Joshua when he answered. â€Å"Because at the Essenes' feast, they don't kill a lamb.†

Sunday, January 5, 2020

Population Growth And The Ethical Dilemma - 1562 Words

Population Growth and the Ethical Dilemma and What We Should Seek to Control It and Why We Should Do So Anonymous Author University of the People Unit 6 Written Assignment Introduction The 21st century is still very young and the world had already recorded extra billion people more than what was recorded in October 1999 whilst in the past, it took humankind until the 19th century to record its 1st billions. With this enormous upsurge in the world population, food and energy supplies future is already bleak than it was in the past decades, in this easy, I will summarize the world population growth and its ethical dilemma and what we should seek to control the problems. Population Growth and the Ethical Dilemma and What We Should†¦show more content†¦What is alarming especially about this dramatic increase is that it is actually taking place in an intensified form in under ­developed nations where the population has already surpassed food production. Similarly, closely related to the question of population, further than that of starvation is the problems brought on by human population compactness, upsurges in tension, pressure, sprawl, and the question of whether the problem that’s arising from the population’s growth can be handled by our political. For an adequate production of food supply to continue, a fertile land is needed couple with fresh water, energy, and natural biodiversity, obviously, if the problem of population growth is not prevented at this stage, the needs for these resources will escalate. Even though these resources in question are not completely exhausted on per capital basis, the supply will dwindle significantly because it must be shared among other people. Many, including myself, are suggesting in the light of this analysis that morally something should be done to reduce and contain the speedy growth of world population by any means necessary to avert over populated planet earth. Human’s population growth should be brought to a halt by adjusting birth rates down in humane ways instead of waiting for death rates to move up as the four horsemen reappear , it

Saturday, December 28, 2019

Identity Is A Long Process Of Exploration And Discovery

What is Identity? Identity is really a complex thing and can’t be as simple as just asking someone who they are as Swartz mentions in his writing, â€Å"What is Identity.† Asking someone the question of who they are barely scrapes the surface of that person’s identity. This poses the internal subconscious thought in many of â€Å"who am I?† When asking oneself â€Å"who am I,† one might think in less complex terms such as; personality, race, ethnicity, culture etc. as the main focus to describe who they are. However, there are many complex elements that contribute to defining a person and who this person claims to be. In order to define ourselves, we must search deeper. Developing into who we are is a long process of exploration and discovery. In order†¦show more content†¦During the earlier development stages, we tend to explore our values, morals, spirituality, racial identity, ethnic identity, sexuality, and gender. While exploring different aspects of ou rselves, we also have the need to conform to society in order to fit in. Identity development, according to Schwartz’ article, is more likely to evolve from â€Å"imitation and internalization of values and beliefs from parents and other authority figures (Schwartz, 98).† Social Identity is the key element in identity development. There are many types of identity categories, which include; ethnicity and religion, political affiliation, vocations and avocations, relationships, and stigmatized identity (Deaux, 2). A social identity is generally a way of categorizing a group of people who share similar identities. However, it is more than just a label. Social identity had various implications for the person who affiliates with a certain identity and for others who view them as a member of certain categories. The social identity categories can be the foundation for cognitive beliefs, emotional associations, and behavioral consequences (Deaux, 4). The learning aspects of social identity are extensive and can vary in terms of personality, attitude, and memories. Social identities are developed and defined in a social setting, many of these aspects are shared. Each of us associate with multiple identities. Someone can identify themselves based on

Thursday, December 19, 2019

Compare and Contrast Essay Ancient Egypt and Greece

Compare and contrast essay: Ancient Egypt and Greece The ancient Egyptian and ancient Greek civilizations are two of the oldest known civilizations in our history. The Egyptian civilization, based in the eastern part of North Africa, is believed to have started around 3150 BC and continued till the end of the Pharaoh rule in 31 BC. The ancient Greek civilization is believed to have been in effect from 1100 BC till about 146 BC. Many similarities and differences existed between these two civilizations, as even though they co-existed during a certain timeframe (1150 BC to 146 BC), they were located in different geographical areas. Because of these differences in geography, both these civilizations were subjected to different kinds of†¦show more content†¦Change was not encouraged and was only brought on about because of outside forces, such as natural disasters or invasions. Both civilizations, were therefore, able to last a long time while keeping true to their roots and their values. Perhaps the biggest impact that the Egyptia n and Greek civilizations had on our Western society was on the iconoclastic ideals and symbols. Many of our current religious as well as social symbols (such as the sun, the moon, etc) have been adopted from the ideas behind Egyptian religion and mythology. The Ancient Egyptians believed that there was more to life than just the life on earth. Much of their architecture, including the pyramids and the houses they built were based on strict rules of mathematics and geography. They used mathematics to build the dwellings in very symmetrical designs. It has been noted that the numbers pi and phi have been greatly incorporated in the building and design of Ancient Egyptian architecture (Greenberg). Researchers have noted that dividing the perimeter of the dwellings made by Ancient Egyptians by their height gives a close approximation to 2pi, which is the same result one would get if one were to divide the circumference of a circle by its radius. This suggests that maybe the ancient Egyptians were trying to emulate the spherical nature of the Earth by presenting this relation (Smith et al). These design techniques show that the Ancient Egyptians built their dwellings very symmetrically. It hasShow MoreRelatedCompare and Contrast Essay: Ancient Egypt and Greece812 Words   |  4 Pages1 Word Count: 806 Compare and Contrast Essay: Ancient Egypt and Greece There are many mysteries to life, ancient civilizations created religion to explain these mysteries. Many ancient civilizations believed in religions that worshiped more than one god or goddess, this is called polytheism. Both the Ancient Egyptians and the Ancient Greeks practiced polytheism. For both ancient civilizations religion was an important part of daily life. Ancient Egyptians and Ancient Greeks had similar creationRead MoreThe Greek And Greek Culture1674 Words   |  7 Pagestrip to Egypt to compare the Greek society to how the Egyptians lived during that time. His overall trip to Egypt was primarily focused on how the Egyptians lived, the geographical information, religion, animals along with the geographical information the discovery of the Nile. He spent a decent amount of time in Egypt enough to give a very detailed description of Egypt’s Culture. Herodotus also went to a few other places and did the same thing, he really focused in on the Persian Wars. 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In ancient Greece, Egypt, and Syria, citizens were executed for a variety of things ranging from perjury to murder. Roman and Mosaic law of antiquity also endorsed the retaliating rule of â€Å"an eye for and eye, tooth for tooth, hand for hand, burn for burn, and Read MoreGp Essay Mainpoints24643 Words   |  99 Pages GP NOTES 2010 (ESSAY) Content Page 1. Media a. New vs. Traditional b. New: narcissistic? c. Government Censorship d. Profit-driven Media e. Advertising f. Private life of public figures g. Celebrity as a role model h. Blame media for our problems i. Power + Responsibility of Media j. Media ethics k. New Media and Democracy 2. Science/Tech a. Science and Ethics b. Government and scientist role in science c. Rely too much on technology? d. Nuclear technologyRead MoreOne Significant Change That Has Occurred in the World Between 1900 and 2005. 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Both the Ancient Egyptians and the Ancient Greeks practiced polytheism. For both ancient civilizations religion was an important part of daily life. Ancient Egyptians and Ancient Greeks had similar creation stories and worshipped similar gods and goddesses yet there beliefs were still very different Both the Ancient Egyptians worshipped many, many gods and goddesses. Each of these gods or†¦show more content†¦As a punishment Zeus created the first woman and gave her the gift of curiosity and a box that she was told to never open. Another difference between these two polytheistic religions is the idea of the sun. In the Ancient Egyptian creation story Nut, the sky, gives birth to the sun every night before dawn, and by day it would follow its course over the Earth and die at sunset. Instead of a god or goddess giving birth to the sun, in Ancient Greece it was believed that Apollo (god of music, medicine, and the sun) drove his golden chariot across the sky. The gods and goddesses and creation stories of Ancient Egypt and Ancient Greece have many similarities and differences. These civilizations both practice a type of religion that worships more than one god. This is called polytheism. The creation stories and basic belief of these Ancient civilization’s religions are still practiced and written about today. In fact many children’s and young adult authors such as Rick Riordan have written fictional and realistic fiction books about these ancient civilization’sShow MoreRelatedCompare and Contrast Essay: Ancient Egypt and Greece2939 Words   |  12 PagesCompare and contrast essay: Ancient Egypt and Greece The ancient Egyptian and ancient Greek civilizations are two of the oldest known civilizations in our history. The Egyptian civilization, based in the eastern part of North Africa, is believed to have started around 3150 BC and continued till the end of the Pharaoh rule in 31 BC. The ancient Greek civilization is believed to have been in effect from 1100 BC till about 146 BC. Many similarities and differences existed between these two civilizationsRead MoreThe Greek And Greek Culture1674 Words   |  7 Pagestrip to Egypt to compare the Greek society to how the Egyptians lived during that time. His overall trip to Egypt was primarily focused on how the Egyptians lived, the geographical information, religion, animals along with the geographical information the discovery of the Nile. He spent a decent amount of time in Egypt enough to give a very detailed description of Egypt’s Culture. Herodotus also went to a few other places and did the same thing, he really focused in on th e Persian Wars. Greece defeatedRead MoreCompare and Contrast Two Statuettes917 Words   |  4 PagesRunning Head: A Compare and Contrast of Two Statuettes A Compare and Contrast of Two Statuettes Mary Karr ART 205 Ââ€" Art Appreciation November 24, 2007 A Compare and Contrast of Two Statuettes I have chosen as the subject of my essay to contrast and compare two female statuettes from ancient cultures. The first is an ancient Egyptian statuette named The Offering Bearer which was discovered about 1920 in the tomb of Meketre in Thebes and appears to have been made around 1985 B.C.E. by anRead MoreAncient Greece, Rome, And Persian Essay2093 Words   |  9 PagesCulture Comparison The civilizations that I decided to elaborate on are Greece, Rome, and Persian. The purpose of this essay is to compare and contrast the similarities and differences of these civilizations. These civilizations will be analyzed in the area of their cultural, social, political, economic, diplomatic and military collating. Greece, Rome, and Persian are very distinctive and fascinating civilization. From the information I have learned through the semester will help me sharply juxtaposeRead MoreChina And Japan During The Age Of Imperialism2077 Words   |  9 Pages Modern Era Comparative Essay China and Japan in the Age of Imperialism 1 LENGTH: 2000-2500 words (7-8 pages) Explore secondary scholarly sources outside of your course textbooks. You must develop a thesis statement, undertake scholarly research, and integrate your findings into an argumentative essay. The type of essay is comparative; you must compare and contrast specific aspect of two nations (or cultural zones)Read MoreSimilarities Between Confucianism And Christianity1849 Words   |  8 PagesCOMPARE AND CONTRAST Essay Outline A Contrast of Confucianism and Christianity Thesis: Chinese Confucianism and Roman Christianity are similar in both set key principles adopted by governments and both were created by leaders who taught by lesson yet different in that Confucianism was promoted by the government whereas political leaders in Rome strongly opposed Christianity. Topic Sentence: Confucianism and Christianity are similar in that both set lasting principles that influenced their governmentsRead MoreArt History7818 Words   |  32 Pagesstarted around same time #61607; Alls started independently #61607; Mesopotamia Ââ€" present day Iraq • Earliest Cradle • Around 4,000BC #61607; Egypt • Around 3,000BC #61607; Southern India • Around 3,000BC #61607; China • Around 2,800BC • Composed of two separated and distinct cradles of civilization • Chapter 2 Ââ€" Egyptian Art o Egypt Ââ€" Latin named coined by Romans o Around 2,800-2,200BC o Originally divided into tow separated kingdoms #61607; Upper kingdom #61607; Lower kingdom Read MoreCapital Punishment: Right or Wrong? Essay1837 Words   |  8 Pagesstands on morality and justice? Is there inequality in the courtroom? Most all of the societies and civilizations throughout time have used the death penalty as a punishment for all kinds of social, criminal, and political wrongdoings. In ancient Greece, Egypt, and Syria, citizens were executed for a variety of things ranging from perjury to murder. Roman and Mosaic law of antiquity also endorsed the retaliating rule of â€Å"an eye for and eye, tooth for tooth, hand for hand, burn for burn, and Read MoreGp Essay Mainpoints24643 Words   |  99 Pages GP NOTES 2010 (ESSAY) Content Page 1. Media a. New vs. Traditional b. New: narcissistic? c. Government Censorship d. Profit-driven Media e. Advertising f. Private life of public figures g. Celebrity as a role model h. Blame media for our problems i. Power + Responsibility of Media j. Media ethics k. New Media and Democracy 2. Science/Tech a. Science and Ethics b. Government and scientist role in science c. Rely too much on technology? d. Nuclear technologyRead MoreOne Significant Change That Has Occurred in the World Between 1900 and 2005. Explain the Impact This Change Has Made on Our Lives and Why It Is an Important Change.163893 Words   |  656 PagesWineburg, Historical Thinking and Other Unnatural Acts: Charting the Future of Teaching the Past Sharon Hartman Strom, Political Woman: Florence Luscomb and the Legacy of Radical Reform Michael Adas, ed., Agricultural and Pastoral Societies in Ancient and Classical History Jack Metzgar, Striking Steel: Solidarity Remembered Janis Appier, Policing Women: The Sexual Politics of Law Enforcement and the LAPD Allen Hunter, ed., Rethinking the Cold War Eric Foner, ed., The New American History